[Interview] 2014 WYYC 1A Champion Gentry Stein

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC 1A Champion Gentry Stein (YoYoFactory)

1A World Yo-Yo Champion Gentry Stein

 

 


Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

I started playing yo-yo when I was 8 years old.

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

I visited the National Y-Yo Museum in Chico, California one day and saw people playing. From that point I knew it was something I wanted to do. The first yo-yo I practiced with was a purple YoYoFactory FAST 201.

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

John Ando:
He is an extremely innovative and stylistic player. I respect that he has accomplished so much in the 1A, 2A and AP divisions. His tricks have a different focus than most players, and he is a brilliant mind when it comes to freestyle construction. John helped me tremendously with my freestyle from last year, and has also helped me this year in coming up with ideas for the freestyle that I never would have imagined. I think SHAQLER (Ando and the rest of his team) put on the best performance yo-yoing has ever seen in the 2010 Worlds AP division. I am so excited to see what Ando and SHAQLER bring to the stage this year.

Rei Iwakura:
Rei should be included in everyone’s favorite players list. Last year I spent a month in Japan and was lucky to have multiple opportunities to practice with Rei. This was the first time I saw his yo-yoing up close in person. Of course I had seen him on videos and on stage at Worlds in the past, but watching him yo-yo up close in person was truly magical. I have never seen a player with so much cleanliness and overall control of the yo-yo. With these attributes, along with his talent in performing, he is a pleasure to watch every time he gets on stage.

Shu Takada:
If you have ever watched one of Shu Takada’s freestyles, then you know why he is one of my favorite players. In my opinion, Shu brings more innovation to the stage than any other yo-yo player. Where Shu gains so much of my respect isn’t just in his trick innovation, but more so his performance innovation. I spent a few days hanging out with Shu in Japan last year, and whenever we spoke of yo-yo, we spoke of performance in freestyle; not tricks. You know how you can watch a movie for the second or third time, and notice something new each time? This also happens with Shu’s freestyles. Go watch one now and you will see what I mean.

 

Q4. What made you choose 1A as your main style?

In my first competition, I competed in the 1A division. From that point, It has been a constant journey of improvement. I am always striving to improve in 1A, and I believe there is not room to spend time with another division right now If I want to continue to reach my current goals.

 

Q5. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

I usually practice randomly throughout my day, by myself or with US National 4A champion Zac Rubino. The practice consists of making new tricks and yo-yoing to new music.

 

Q6. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

This definitely changes when preparing for a contest. Firstly, I will set aside much more time to practice. Also, when preparing for a contest I do not try to create any new tricks. Instead, I practice only the tricks I am planning to do on stage. I run through my routine with music, stopping only if I have a new idea to improve the routine.

 

Q7. What is the best part of yo-yoing, in your opinion?

In my opinion, the best part of yo-yoing is its mixture of creativity and competition. I love both of these things, and I think when they are mixed, I thrive.

 

Q8. Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?

In 2013, I didn’t pass to finals at the World Yo-Yo Contest. I was extremely upset with this situation, but I eventually came to the conclusion that it needed to happen. Not passing to finals in 2013 shined a light on my ignorance. It allowed me to realize what was wrong with my yo-yoing and my mindset. It allowed me to reflect on what I do, and was the first step in a better understanding. I believe that this experience allowed me to become World Champion.

 

Q9. How did you feel when you became a world champion?

It felt unreal. I had to watch a video of the results in order to feel like it truly happened. The whole day just felt right, even before I stepped on stage.

 

Q10. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming a world champion?

I have gotten a lot more opportunities to travel. Since becoming World Champion, I have performed in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Japan, and Spain. I did work very hard to earn these opportunities, but I know I am also very lucky to have received them.

 

Q11. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

I feel very confident with my freestyle. I am bringing something to the table at a level nobody has seen before.
I am looking forward to the event as a whole, along with all of the amazing freestyles I know will be performed.

 


Many thanks to Gentry Stein! We wish him the best of luck at WYYC2015.

[Interview] 2014 WYYC Women’s Division Champion Tessa Piccillo

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC Women’s Division Champion Tessa Piccillo (YoYoJam)

Women World Yo-Yo Champion Tessa Piccillo

 

 


Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

I started yo-yoing in the summer of 2009.

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

I started yo-yoing with my dad’s Yomega Brain (he has had it forever) just on the way to school every day. Then in the summer, my dad got really sick so whenever I would visit him in the hospital I would try to learn a new trick beforehand so I could show him. I started watching yo-yo tutorials on YouTube and then went to my first contest.

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

Here are just some of the people who have either helped me with yo-yoing or are some of my favorite players: Grant Johnson, Joseph Harris, Eric Koloski, Ben Conde, Hiroyuki Suzuki, Christopher Chia, Tal Mordoch.

 

Q4. What made you choose 1A as your main style?

1A is usually the style people start out with, so I was hooked on it pretty quickly. I really love coming up with long tricks and it doesn’t get old.

 

Q5. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

I usually practice in my backyard either with headphones in or I bring a speaker out. I always yo-yo to music, even when I’m just practicing tricks. If I get the chance, I’ll practice with other yo-yoers, like if I can make it to a club near me or right before a contest when everyone’s hanging out.

 

Q6. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

I usually practice at least an hour a day, but if a contest is coming up then I’ll be practicing for a few hours. For a contest like Worlds, I try to start practicing months in advance.

 

Q7. What is the best part of yo-yoing, in your opinion?

Everything about yo-yoing is awesome, but the best part about it in my opinion is the community and all the people. Also all of the opportunities I’ve gotten through yo-yoing, like traveling, performing at events, and teaching people. But the thing I look forward to most when preparing for a contest/yo-yo related event is meeting a bunch of awesome new people and hanging out with friends I’ve gotten close to because of yo-yos.

 

Q8. Do you have any good stories from before you won last year that you want to share with us?

There was some weird stuff that happened in Prague before I performed but I won’t talk about that.

 

Q9. How did you feel when you won last year?

I was pretty excited, I was happy with my routine and happy that I hit it clean for the most part. I had such a good time meeting/competing with all the girls.

 

Q10. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming winning?

Ever since I won, it has only made me practice harder and stay more focused. Also I was surprised to see how much media attention I got locally. That was pretty cool.

 

Q11. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

I’m so excited to compete again, it was so much fun last year. I always look forward to seeing everyone and watching all the finalists. I’ve been practicing a lot, and I can’t wait to visit Tokyo.

 


Many thanks to Tessa Piccillo! We wish her the best of luck at WYYC2015.

[Interview] 2014 WYYC 2A Champion Takuma Yamamoto

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC 2A Champion Takuma Yamamoto

2A World Yo-Yo Champion Takuma Yamamoto

 

 


 

Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

Around August of 1997.

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

I became interested when I saw my friend [playing yo-yo].

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

Koji Yokoyama. If it weren’t for him I wouldn’t be who I am today.

 

Q4. What made you choose 2A as your main style?

My extended time practicing for the *THP-Japan Level…maybe.

 

Q5. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

I practice the tricks I think I want to do at the next contest.

 

Q6. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

On weekdays I do nothing but practice each trick in my routine’s order at home. On days off I rent a room and do nothing but repeated, full run-throughs of my freestyle with music.

 

Q7. Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?

Nothing…in particular…

 

Q8. How did you feel when you became a world champion?

I felt relieved.

 

Q9. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming a world champion?

I guess I have been practicing more than ever.

 

Q10. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

I’ll try to do [my freestyle] relaxed.

 

Q11. What is yo-yo to you?

Life.

 

*Translator’s note: The Japan Level was the Hyper Yo-Yo (1997) authorized “THP-Japan Pro Spinner Level.” In that level there were many 2A tricks.


 

Many thanks to Takuma Yamamoto! We wish him the best of luck at WYYC2015.

[Interview] 2014 WYYC AP Champion SPINATION

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC AP (Artistic Performance) Champion SPINATION

AP World Yo-Yo Champion SPINATION

 

 


Interview Key
T: TOMMY (aka Tomiyuki Watanabe)
S: SOUL (aka Yu Kawada)

 

Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

T: In August of 1997.

S: I don’t remember well, but probably around the spring of 1997.

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

T: A manga called “Moero Spinner” [something like “Burn up Spinner” in English] was being published in Coro Coro Comic magazine and I saw it and thought it was “Cool!”

S: For some reason or another, I picked up a yo-yo from the display on the right-hand side near the entrance of a toy store. That was the beginning.

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

T: Yu Kawada – He was the reason the AP Division was established, and he is the only one I will go to for an opinion about my yo-yo performance [and vice versa].
Hironori Mii – He was the person who got me to participate in the World Contest [for the first time] and I wouldn’t be who I am now without him.
Hiroyuki Suzuki – Even while the younger generation keeps moving up, he’s still fighting at the top, and the cleanness of his tricks is on another level.
Takuma Yamamoto & Tsubasa Onishi – I watch their freestyles and think they’re really incredible. Their attitude is like an athlete’s.

S: TOMMY – There is no one who surpasses his ability to express with a yo-yo.
Hiroyuki Suzuki, Kengo Kido, Atsushi Yamada – As well as being yo-yo players, they all have started their own brands and stand out as leaders [in the yo-yo world].

 

Q4. What made you two come together to form SPINATION?

T: In 2012 I was planning a performance project and I invited Yu and we performed together. After that [we realized] we are both World Champions and are both mainstays of the AP Division! If we join forces we can’t lose!! Then, not only just at Worlds, we started doing real theater and other performances [together].

S: I hadn’t entered the World Contest since 2006, but I began to have some strong feelings about the AP Division itself. The feeling of wanting to enter the AP Division began to overflow [in me]. However, I also felt like there was a limit to what I could accomplish as a solo act.
In my thinking, the power of expression and the number of things one can do can increase with the number of people participating. I came to the conclusion that for yo-yo and the AP Division to get on the same level as other entertainment fields, it was necessary to form a team of high level players and make an attempt at something bigger.
It was there that [I decided] to join up with TOMMY, someone who had been away from the yo-yo world for a while and was working as a professional in the entertainment world, but who had the same high level of thinking [about AP as I did]. SPINATION was formed with the goal of broadening the possibilities of yo-yo and moving closer to first-class entertainment.

 

Q5. Usually, what kind of performance activity do you do as SPINATION?

T: For the most part, our main focus is on domestic street performance festivals. We also do performances at other types of events. From now on we are also proactively working toward developing theater stage shows.

 

Q6. I would imagine that there might be some difficulties with practicing together. Can you tell us about some of your experiences?

T: The most difficult thing is that our practice time together is very limited. We are based in Aichi [Prefecture] and Tokyo so it is fairly hard for the two of us to make enough time. In order to practice together, one of us has to travel to where the other is, so the journey itself is rough. Haha…

S: Creating a performance that both of us can be satisfied with is difficult. Together, we have a strong mutual understanding so things often go smoothly, however we don’t always agree on things like choreography, tricks used, or the direction [of an idea]. Thus, doing something new is a difficult process, but we do our best to have confidence in performing each [show] we have produced.

 

Q7. Do you have any good stories from last year, before you became world champions, that you want to share with us?

T: First of all, last year we had a fairly hard time deciding on our music. We had decided the theme and image [we were going for] first, but neither of us came across the right music and practicing [under those circumstances] was rough… We practiced hard like that for three weeks, but at the end both of us thought,”We can’t win with this so let’s scrap the whole thing.” Haha…
The biggest episode of all was Yu’s sudden health collapse the day before our AP Final performance. We still don’t know the cause, but he experienced more than 24 hours of horrible gastrointestinal issues and was completely unable to eat or drink. He was in no condition to be performing. The night before we were seriously considering withdrawing from the competition. Yu falling down at the end of our freestyle video is real evidence that he had reached his limit in more ways than one.

S: That’s right. I fell totally ill right before our performance. It was the first time in my life that even just standing was painful. Your body is an investment, so it’s really important to take care of yourself, especially when you are in a foreign country. Everyone, please take care! With water and raw foods especially.

 

Q8. How did you feel when you became world champions?

T: I was so happy we repeated our championship!

S: So glad!!!

 

Q9. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming world champions?

S: Nothing has really changed, but I would like to make movement toward holding the AP Division in Japan [Translator’s note: we think he means at Japan Nationals].

 

Q10. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

T: We will definitely win for the third consecutive time! We hope that we will be able to pull off a performance that will make you think “It’s just like SPINATION [to do something like this]!” Please cheer for us!!

 

Q11. What is yo-yo to you?

T: It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that it’s my “Partner in life.” Haha…
It is also like a part of my body, as well as the thing that gave me infinite possibilities of expressing myself.

S: It is one aspect of my own possibilities.

 


 

Many thanks to TOMMY and SOUL of SPINATION! We wish them the best of luck at WYYC2015.

WYYC2015 Walking Tour Details

Hi everyone! I’m Hilary, Hironori​ Mii’s wife. I’m a staff member for #wyyc2015 and I’m in charge of the Tokyo Walking Tour.

The aim of this tour is to get you oriented in the Akihabara area and show you some of the cultural offerings available within walking distance of the WYYC contest venue.

Tour:
Date: Wednesday, August 12th
Meeting Place: In front of Belle Salle (the Worlds contest venue)
Time: Please arrive before 13:00 (1 pm). We will depart on-time so do not be late.

Planned stops:

-Akihabara Station area (some popular spots, how to buy a Suica train pass)
-Yodobashi Camera (best place for technology, electronics shopping; will pass by and introduce)
-2k540 Aki-Oka Artisan shopping area
-Ameyoko and the Ueno Station area (passing through)
-Ueno Park (park, museums, temples, zoo, lake; we will walk through and introduce various cultural spots)

We will return to Belle Salle by 16:00 (4 pm).

Just so I know how many people will be joining the tour, please email me with your name and number of people attending at hilaryrewind (at) gmail.com
Please contact me by Tuesday, August 11th, 22:00 (10 pm) Japan time, at the latest, if you would like to join.

Thanks, and see you in Tokyo!

[Interview] 2014 WYYC 5A Champion Takeshi Matsuura

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC 5A Champion Takeshi Matsuura (Turning Point)

5A World Yo-Yo Champion Takeshi Matsuura

 

 


 

Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

When I was in 1st Grade in Elementary School!

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

Because of the 2003 Hyper Yo-Yo [promotion]!

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

There are players I admire but I’ll leave it without saying who.

 

Q4. What made you choose 5A as your main style?

I was shocked to realize “There’s such a division in yo-yoing!” and it seemed interesting!

 

Q5. Last year you were also the runner-up in the WYYC 1A Division. Other than 5A and 1A, do you plan to enter any other divisions in the future?

I haven’t really decided, but if I start to feel like I want to enter [a division] I will!

 

Q6. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

Usually I don’t play yo-yo in a “practicing” sense. I just kind of do what I want to do at that moment.

 

Q7. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

Before contests I rent a room in the community center and practice in a wide-open space.

 

Q8. Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?

Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?
None in particular.

 

Q9. How did you feel when you became a world champion?

I was happy!

 

Q10. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming a world champion?

I received the Global Award from my home prefecture, Saitama, and became a Saitama Goodwill Ambassador!

 

Q11. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

This year I plan to make a great effort in not only 5A, but also 1A. I want to do freestyles I can personally feel satisfied with and I aim to win, so please cheer for me!

 

Q12. What is yo-yo to you?

[Yo-Yo is] Something that continues to broaden my world!

 


 

Many thanks to Takeshi Matsuura! We wish him the best of luck at WYYC2015.

[Interview] 2014 WYYC 4A Champion Rei Iwakura

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC 4A Champion Rei Iwakura (C3yoyodesign)

4A World Yo-Yo Champion Rei Iwakura

 

 


 

Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

In 1997 (if I remember correctly, in the fall).

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

At the time yo-yo was going through a popularity boom [in Japan].
My friend brought a Hyper Brain to our Elementary School’s festival and he showed me some basic tricks like Rock the Baby and Walk the Dog. It was partially because of the boom, but I thought, “I want to try it!” and made up my mind. That same day I went with several friends to a toy store in my neighborhood and we bought red Imperials. I remember that it took about a week to be able to do a Long Sleeper for five seconds.

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

Hiroyuki Suzuki
At the World Contest from 2001-2014, for at least 10 years he has advanced to the Final round, and has won the hotly contested 1A Division four times. More than just “winning,” he has “continued to win;” more than “chasing [after other players],” he has “been chased.” Due to those things it can be assumed that he has been faced with enormous pressure, furthermore in 1A, and even then he is still battling it out at the top.

Naoto Okada
[I respect how] he has seriously explored the depths of off string and how he carefully cultivates his competition freestyles. Not only in competition, but his show performances are also extremely polished, and he does it all without attempting to get away with using his show as an excuse to go easy. He has both strong technical and performance skills, and does a performance that is suitable of the title “World Champion” in various places [around the world].

Shu Takada
In the Division of 2A, which particularly takes a long time to acquire technical skills, he has an outlook of always trying to do new things, and focuses on entertainment to use his performance to delight his audience. He loses neither of those qualities in competition and continues to display them at a very high level.

 

Q4. What made you choose 4A as your main style?

I started tackling 4A as a competitor for the first time just after I started university, but at the same time I was also juggling and playing diabolo. Both of those have many shared skills with 4A, so when I think about it now I think [4A] was very approachable [for me]. One more reason was that I often practiced with Eiji Okuyama, who was already active at the forefront of the [4A competition] scene. He taught me tricks, we created tricks together, and so I think my time practicing 4A naturally increased.

 

Q5. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

As a working adult, there are limits to the time and location [I can practice], so I try to keep in mind the most efficient way to practice in order to raise my level even just a little bit. On weekdays when I’m very limited as to where and when I can practice, I mostly practice tricks by repetition. On the other hand, on the weekend I spend most of my time practicing my freestyle performance and attempting new tricks.
Also, to a certain point I try to decide that day’s practice schedule, whether it is for an hour, two, or more.
I find that if I decide a goal or theme for each practice session (ex. trick repetition -or- freestyle run-through -or- developing new tricks -or- working on my weaker elements, etc.) it’s easier to tackle and more efficient overall.
As for the people I practice with, Shinya Kido and Kazuki Okada live nearby, and Hiroyasu Ishihara and Yusuke Otsuka. We often get together and practice.

 

Q6. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

I primarily focus most of my practice on doing freestyle run-throughs. In addition, when I’m practicing with other people, in order to get used to doing my performance with other people watching, I try my best to get through the whole routine without stopping.

The other things I’m careful about are:
– Practice in the same outfit I plan to wear in competition.
– No matter how many mistakes I make, I follow the structure of the routine until the end.
With 4A, the string is often close to my body. I have a lot of tricks where the string touches and moves around my body so I need to make sure I get used to doing those tricks in costume, otherwise the string may catch my clothing in an unexpected way and could lead to an extremely unfortunate and wasteful mistake.

Also, even if I have a lot of mistakes when I practice [my freestyle], I don’t stop the music. I think it is very important that I run through the entire routine until the end. Of course, at the contest it’s possible that I may not have a no-miss routine, so if I don’t practice like that, I may not be able to recover from a mistake and from there my freestyle might start to fall apart. Therefore, I think it’s necessary to make a habit of recovering from mistakes. A yo-yo freestyle is a very limited time of only 3 minutes. You need to be able to decide in a split-second whether or not to change your yo-yo, so I try to focus my practice on recovering from mistakes and enhancing my own ability to make quick decisions to cope with my situation.

 

Q7. Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?

At the 2013 World Yo-Yo Contest, my freestyle had more mistakes than any other freestyle in my competitive history, and that was a huge shock for me. My theme after that was “comeback” and I practiced [thinking about that] for a full year. After 2013 WYYC ended, two days after I returned to Japan, I went straight to the local gymnasium/community center and started practicing for the next year’s contest.

[I thought about] how to tackle yo-yo as a competitive sport, and what kind of practice would be necessary for that. I had to reconsider my own weak points. I put all of that thought into starting practicing again. I also got a lot of motivation from watching different communities other than yo-yo. When I looked at the top contenders of worlds such as Diabolo, Juggling and Dance, I saw that they are thoroughly exploring their crafts, and thought that this was no time for me to let myself fall into a slump.

 

Q8. How did you feel when you became a world champion?

For the one entire year I spent [practicing and preparing], the happiness of reaching my absolute best possible result was huge. As far as my freestyle, it was quite possibly my first ever perfect, no-miss, 3-minute routine in my entire life. It was a very emotional moment for me. I felt that the hundreds of hours I spent practicing and trying to get better were not in vain.

 

Q9. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming a world champion?

Actually there weren’t any sudden changes for me in particular.
If anything, at the World Contest I set my next goals, and in practicing I increased my repertoire of new tricks. Looking back at last year’s World Contest, I felt that the level of competition was the highest in recent years and the level of perfection in each player’s routine suddenly jumped.

This time I was able to attain the title of “4A Division World Champion” for the third time. However, there are still tricks I cannot do. I still make mistakes at competitions. There are still tricks that I need to improve my execution rate with. And above all, there are so many players that are better than I am.

I am far from being “The best player in the world,” or “The perfect player.” Of course I want to get better and improve my way of practicing, and continue my enthusiasm that I have built up since the 2013 World Contest.

 

Q10. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

Of course, since the World Contest is taking place in my own country, and up until now no one in the history of the 4A Division has successfully defended their championship, if I am able to win that would be amazing.

However, in order to do that there is so much I need to do to prepare, and I have new tricks I want to perform so I need to improve their level of perfection. Of course, I can’t forget my original intent to work toward my goal of doing my 100% best on the contest stage. Since this is also the very first time the World Contest will be held in Asia, many veteran players from other Asian countries who previously found it difficult to attend due to location reasons will compete, so I am very much looking forward to the competition itself.

 

Q11. What is yo-yo to you?

(More than I ever imagined) The Spice of Life

 


 

Many thanks to Rei Iwakura! We wish him the best of luck at WYYC2015.

AP feedback from judges

AP (ARTISTIC PERFORMANCE DIVISION)

This year, we had 17 entries from all over the world in Artistic Performance (AP) Division. Thank you for all of your submissions and hard work.

We have updated the AP page about feedback to the contestants who did not make it to the final round.

http://tokyo15.com/en/contest-divisions/ap-division/

[SURPRISE ANNOUNCEMENT] 44CLASH Battle Event is coming to WYYC!

Hi, everyone! This is Ue-san from the World Yo-Yo Contest 2015 Organizing Team.

We will have a 44CLASH Battle Event at the Event Stage (1st floor) of the World Yo-Yo Contest 2015.
We will announce more details soon.

banner_battle

http://www.44clash.com/wyyc/

English Page : http://www.44clash.com/wyyc/eng.html

We are also going to have “44FESTA presents WYYC2015 Official Booth” to entertain non yo-yo visitors.

We hope you enjoy our 1st floor event. See you in Tokyo!

[Interview] 2014 WYYC 3A Champion Hajime Miura

[2014 World Yo-Yo Contest Champion Interview]

2014 WYYC 3A Champion Hajime Miura (sOMEThING)

3A World Yo-Yo Champion Hajime Miura


 

Q1. When did you start playing yo-yo?

When I was in 2nd Grade (Elementary School).

 

Q2. Why did you start playing yo-yo?

I met Takahiro Mimura (“Miimun”) at a Hyper Yo-Yo event.

 

Q3. Who are some of the yo-yo players you respect/admire/look up to?

Hank Freeman – because he is a 3-time consecutive World Champion in 3A and he has new tricks in his freestyle at every contest.
Hiroyuki Suzuki – because of his speedy tricks and his sharp freestyles.
Sora Ishikawa – because he does unique tricks that no one else is doing, and he advances smoothly from trick to trick.

 

Q4. What made you choose 3A as your main style?

I watched Ken Takabayashi and Kentaro Kimura’s freestyle videos and thought they were cool.

 

Q5. How do you usually practice (where, who with, etc.)?

I work on creating new tricks to get ready for my next contest or practice meeting’s freestyle.

 

Q6. How does that change when you are preparing for different types of contests?

I repeatedly practice my routine.

 

Q7. Do you have any good stories from before you became a world champion that you want to share with us?

Last year I didn’t go to juku* so I had a lot of time to practice.
*(Juku is like tutoring or prep school.)

 

Q8. How did you feel when you became a world champion?

I was very happy. I was excited to stand on the Worlds stage that I had been dreaming about.

 

Q9. Is there anything that changed for you after becoming a world champion?

Nothing in particular.

 

Q10. Last year, in addition to winning the World Yo-Yo Contest, you also won such big contests as Japan Nationals and the Asia Pacific Yo-Yo Championships, and you were the youngest player ever to do it. Do you have a new goal or dream you are aiming for?

(If I can travel abroad) I hope to achieve a grand slam* once more.
*(By “grand slam” he means winning his Nationals, AP (multi national) and Worlds in the same year.)

 

Q11. How do you feel going into this year’s World Yo-Yo Contest?

I didn’t place well at 2015 Japan Nationals so I’m determined to do better at Worlds.

 

Q12. What is yo-yo to you?

It’s just a small thing that’s always spinning, but it has the power to connect the world.


 

Many thanks to Hajime and his mother! We wish him the best of luck at WYYC2015.

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